Using Roast Analyzer


#1

Can someone please point to resource that explains how to use the RoastWorld Analyzer?
Here’s one I just did but don’t have the foggiest idea what it means or what to do with it.


#2

I think it’s best when you select more than one roast to compare.


#3

Agreed but it really doesn’t add any analysis that I have been able to find…besides overlaying roasts of different sessions of the same bean…


#4

I know there’s some higher use for the analyzer but I’m just not informed enough to understand it.

However, I found the Roast Analyzer helpful in trouble shooting. It was using the Roast Analyzer that I first was able to see the drift in IBTS as it accumulates grunge on the lens. The thermocouple (Bean Temp) is generally going to be the most consistent (assuming the same charge weight). The Roast Analyzer shows that consistency pretty well, but IBTS drifts downward from one roast to the next as the contamination builds on the IBTS lens. When I clean the lens it clearly shows the change back to a higher value.

It also shows clearly inconsistencies in how I mark FC!

Bruce


#5

Thanks everyone for the feedback. Being totally naive I was expecting feedback that would point out some errors I was making or how to improve a roast. Guess I’ll have to toy with this a bit more.


#6

There are folks on here that are knowledgeable about Roast Analyzer for improving their roast. That’s not me, but hopefully they’ll jump in so we can both pick up something helpful!

Bruce


#7

New user here. Please explain where Roast Analyzer is located. I can not seem to locate it on the RoastTime application. Thanks


#8

The tool is in Roast.World, not RT. Go to…

Roast.World -> (Your) Dashboard -> Roasts -> Roasts Analyzer.

The analyzer has a few issues, e.g. adding a lot of roasts for simultaneous viewing stretches the Y-axis to accommodate all the file names of the roasts selected. That stretches the charts making it more difficult to see the larger picture and timing differences. Still, it’s a powerful tool for analyzing data and timing. Limiting the number of charts to say 3-5 at one time makes the composite chart manageable.

Bruce