Unreal Ethiopian Fruit Bomb


#1

After about a dozen roasts I’m finally getting comfortable with the Bullet, and last night worked my way through the SM sampler pack to the Ethiopian Organic Dry Process Sidamo Keramo “fruit bomb”. I’ve always roasted dark, sticking primarily with Guatemalans and Sumatras, and dropping at the first snap of 2C. But after reading other’s posts about how Ethiopians need to be lightly roasted I clearly needed to try something new. I shot for a quick yellowing, slow down during browning, and drop at 20% development. Here’s what happened:

Ethiopian Fruit Bomb

It was obvious this coffee was special as soon as it hit the cooling bowl. The strawberry cream aroma didn’t even smell like coffee. This morning’s pour-over was unbelievable, all of the flavors in the SM cupping notes were right there.

Ok maybe I’m gushing a bit here, but this is the kind of transformation that I was looking for / hoping for with the Bullet. It is so much fun to discover what I suppose many of you already know. The question in this post, if there is one, to those of you who are familiar with this and similar Ethiopians: what could I have done better? Hotter preheat, shorter overall?

  • Brad

#2

Congrats! Sounds like a perfect roast for you. I don’t think I’d change anything if the coffee was that good, and I’m glad it was. I wish I’d bought some, but had recently placed an order when it came available.

If there’s anything I’d suggest, it would be to standardize on a charge weight, like 454 grams in this case, to keep your profiles more controllable. I’m guessing you used the whole 1 lb bag, as most often SM adds a little extra :). I save all my “leftovers” from 1, 2, and 5 lb bags until I get a whole lb and roast it all together as a mega blend…sometimes it is extraordinary.


#3

Congratulations Brad! Nice to hit one out of the park once in awhile isn’t it? The real trick will be getting more ordered before it disappears! :slight_smile: Over a decade ago I bought some Brazilian beans from SM which just happened to match perfectly the one (and only!) profile I had when roasting on my BBQ+drum. It was an amazing cup. Went back for more and got the dreaded “Out of stock” message! Completely changed my buying habits… I now have way too much coffee stockpiled.

Bruce


#4

looks to be a great roast, congrats!!
I don’t buy coffee from SM, but your profile is very close to my production roast. here is my profile for comparison.


#5

Thanks guys for this advice. I sure do wish we could get more of those beans. When a chance does come to stock up on some special beans, how long do you plan they’ll retain top quality? 6 months or more?

I didn’t realize that batch size difference of 454g vs. 470g was significant, but the Bullet certainly is precise and I like the mega blend idea.

Unfortunately, the intense aroma and sweetness in my roast faded noticeably after only 3 days. It’s still a very good cup, but no longer a bomb. Is that typical for light and/or Ethiopian roasts? Could I expect more longevity if I roasted differently, say shorten the drying phase or drop 30 seconds earlier?

  • Brad

#6

Hi, I have noticed the 3 day limit when roasts smell of fruits and such. I want to say I remember one or two roast coming back in 7-12 days with such clarity, but I have had so many that fell off after 3 days (not just Ethiopians) I assume this is the norm. Though I just did some roasts of an Ethiopian DP and a Nicaraguan (Pacamara) DP using another DP profile and there was vague but consistent fruit notes that have now lasted for…8ish days, that is when I finished off the beans…

I do notice that between the different roast profiles/beans, that the clearer the smell of fruit that pops out during crack; whether concord grape, mango, strawberry, etc. they’re clear but they fall of in 3 days but when the fruits start sometime in Millard, although vague, the beans smell fruitier for longer during rest.

I also noticed that the closer a bean is processing > variety > varietal (origin) the better a good profile works from one bean to another and requires less adjustments/variations.

Have you all noticed this, or is this just my own experience?